This website uses cookies to function correctly.
You may delete cookies at any time but doing so may result in some parts of the site not working correctly.

Muscle Relaxing Injections

Muscle Relaxing Injections

Every time we frown, squint or smile the skin is creased in the areas of greatest use. The more expressive you are the deeper the lines become. These expression lines include crow's feet, worry lines and frown lines. As we age, collagen production slows down and the problem accelerates as we are less able to repair the damage.


How does it work?

Botox® temporarily blocks the nerve endings to the facial muscles relaxing them. By reducing muscle movement, the skin stops being creased and is allowed to recover, causing the lines to soften and fade away. Over time the patient can retrain the facial muscles to be less expressive by breaking the habit of subconscious overuse.


Is it safe?

The cosmetic benefits of Botox® were discovered in 1990 and it has been used effectively and safely ever since.


What happens during treatment?

The treatment involves injecting very small doses of Botox® via an extremely fine needle into the appropriate area. This sometimes causes a brief stinging sensation. Discomfort is so mild that anaesthesia is not required. Normal activity can be resumed immediately after the procedure.


Are there any side-effects?

No serious side effects have ever been reported, when using Botox® for cosmetic treatments. Minor side effects occur in a small number of patients and are always fully reversible within a few days to a few weeks. Immediately after the injection there may be mild swelling and redness which subsides within a few days.

Bruising at the injection site may occur, this can be covered with makeup if needed. Rarely a temporary drooping of the eye lid may occur, this resolves within a few weeks. Very rarely following repeated injections the patient may develop antibodies to Botox®. This makes subsequent treatments ineffective.



Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website